Tools

Influenza

Influenza (the flu) is the name for a series of viruses that are spread through the air. Symptoms of the flu or similar but worse than the common cold. 

Flu season starts in October and continues until May in the United States, which means that your child is especially at risk for contracting the flu season during those months. As the winter wears on, your child may become even more at risk until the flu season peaks in February. 

Although the virus can cause serious complications for the young and elderly, there is no need to fear the flu if you prepare your family and take precautions before the season strikes. If you think your child might be at any sort of risk, the best action you can take to avoid the flu is to set up an appointment for him or her to receive the vaccine, which is available in a number of forms. Your child can be vaccinated with a nasal spray, or an intramuscular or intra-dermal shot, which is administered just under the skin. 

Receiving the flu vaccine will not guarantee that your child will be flu free, but it significantly reduces the odds that you will contract the virus. There is a two week period after you receive the vaccine before it becomes fully effective, so you should help your child make an effort to practice proper hand washing techniques and avoid contact with people who might have the flu. If your child does happen to come down with the flu after being vaccinated, he or she will most likely experience a much milder version of the virus.

Programs + Services


General Pediatrics Practice

Find top pediatric primary care physicians in Boston, MA at Floating Hospital for Children. Our doctors offer comprehensive care services for younger patients.
More


Infectious Disease

Pediatric Infectious Disease at Floating Hospital for Children in Boston offers complete diagnostic and therapeutic care for children with infections.
More

Doctors + Care Team

Amanda F. Goddard, MD

Amanda F. Goddard, MD

Title(s): Infectious Diseases Pediatrician; Assistant Professor, Tufts University School of Medicine
Department(s): Pediatrics, Pediatric Infectious Disease
Appt. Phone: 617-636-8100
Fax #: 617-636-0066

Transplant infectious diseases, infections immunosuppressed hosts, antibiotic resistance, bone and joint infections

More Info

Andrew C. Siesennop, MD

Andrew C. Siesennop, MD

Title(s): Pediatrician; Assistant Professor, Tufts University School of Medicine
Department(s): Pediatrics, General Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine
Appt. Phone: 617-636-5255
Fax #: 617-636-7719

General pediatrics, adolescent medicine

More Info

H. Cody Meissner, MD

H. Cody Meissner, MD

Title(s): Chief, Division of Pediatric Infectious Disease; Professor of Pediatrics, Tufts University School of Medicine
Department(s): Pediatrics, Pediatric Infectious Diseases
Appt. Phone: 617-636-8100
Fax #: 617-636-0066

Immunizations, Kawasaki disease, immuno-deficiencies, respiratory viruses

More Info

Tufts Medical Center and Floating Hospital for Children have high quality care.

Quality + Safety

A world-class pediatric teaching hospital shouldn’t make you and your child feel small.  At Floating Hospital for Children our littlest patients are our biggest priority. This means we’re committed to providing the highest quality of care in a safe, friendly environment.

Learn more
A child in the pediatric emergency department at Floating Hospital for Children.

Floating Ranks With the Best

The Leapfrog Group gave Floating Hospital for Children and Tufts Medical Center an “A” rating for outstanding patient safety in 2014.

Learn more
Floating Hospital for Children has a strong history of innovation.

A Fresh Breath of Air

Floating Hospital for Children began its life as a hospital ship in the Boston Harbor in 1894 before coming onshore permanently in 1931.

Learn more